Facts in Five

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The Young Napoleon Edition

 

  • George McClellan’s father was a renowned physician and founder of the Thomas Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia
  • McClellan graduated West Point ranked second in the vaunted class of 1846- his classmates included Thomas J. Jackson, Jesse Reno, Cadmus Wilcox, AP Hill, and George Pickett
  • Jefferson Davis was an influential mentor in McClellan’s life- sending him on secret reconnaissance missions into the Caribbean, and to the Crimea as our official observer during the Crimean War
  • Small victories in western Virginia would pave the way for West Virginia statehood- a profile of him in the New York Herald brought national attention to the “Napoleon of the present War”
  • Winfield Scott cautioned Lincoln against appointing McClellan General-in-chief in addition to his army command- Little Mac’s response was, “I can do it all” 

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Peaceful Protest is Forgotten

Dr. King proclaimed the need for action, cooperation, and brotherhood.  Physical violence only begets more…

 

The chaos on our streets today besmirch his memory….

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“We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our crea­tive protests to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of melding physical force with soul force. The marvelous new mili­tancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. They have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone. And as we walk we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.”

King, Martin Luther. “I Have a Dream by Martin Luther King, Jr; August 28, 1963.” The Avalon Project, Yale Law School, avalon.law.yale.edu/20th_century/mlk01.asp.

Myths about Quotes from Generals Lee and Grant

History Myths Debunked

Since we are coming up on the 154th anniversary of the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse (April 9), I thought I’d re-run this early post from 2011. It was written by Gary Adams our first guest blogger:
 
My name is Gary Adams and I run a Face Book group by the name of Southern Heritage Preservation. Don’t allow the name to fool you– our goal is that of  Cicero: “THE FIRST law of the historian is that he shall never dare utter an untruth. The second is that he shall suppress nothing that is true. Moreover, there shall be no suspicion of partiality in his writing, or of malice.”  After what Southroners call “the war,” events and remarks were recorded by various sources that “usually” ensured the event and quote were correct, but that was not the case during the ear in question.  We take these stories and adages and examine them…

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A Lying Execrable Plagiarist, and His Helpers at the Smithsonian

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Like just about everybody else that knows anything about American history, I’ve fulminated about the crap (which is what Mitch Daniels, then Governor of Indiana and now President of Purdue called it when Zinn finally died) that is Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States which is not only bad history slanted far left  but full of  plagiarism, as the main link today tells us.

In any case, what brings this on is that The Smithsonian is sponsoring some seminars to help history teachers to lie (perhaps inadvertently) to their students by promoting Zinn’s execrable pseudohistory. Mary Grabar explains on The Federalist:

This semester, the Smithsonian Institution is helping. Teachers will learn new teaching strategies and receiving continuing education credits at two “teach-ins” — on Sept. 7 in Washington, D.C., at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, and on Sept. 28 in New…

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The Civil War is Being Lost

In 2013 I attended the sesquicentennial celebrations at Gettysburg.  150 years of living history, remembrance,  and understanding.

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I tried to describe the experience in words….

 

A week never to be forgotten– the perfect culmination to my 20+ years of reenacting – men and women from all over the country coming together for history and remembrance-

Spiritual connections–  Every reenactor on the field could feel the magnitude of the occasion, and at times it was awe inspiring.  The brave men who struggled here do speak to us, we do our best to honor their memory- by sharing the experience with the latest generation.

The real purpose-  Living history is an education experience.  Reenactors are students of the Civil War as well as a gateway to the past for spectators.  A reenactor who quits learning has already left the hobby.  There was plenty to learn this week by all in attendance…  for the sake of our country, let’s hope the lessons were embraced by everyone.

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        Learning- Remembrance- Inspiration- Healing….

I believed the event had helped our country turn a corner

    I was wrong…

 

The seminal event of our history- the most written about subject in all of our history-  is being rebranded by overly-sensitive reactionaries completely disinterested in finding meaning in the sacrifice made by 715,000 Americans.

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James McPherson described our Civil War experience the best:

Five generations(now six)  have passed and the War is still with us…”

Carnegie and Protecting Wealth

Andrew Carnegie rationalized his notoriously low wages… in a speech dedicating one of his 2,800 libraries in Pittsburgh in 1895;

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“The plan suggested does not commend itself as justifiable or wise, because there are higher uses for surplus wealth than adding petty sums to the earnings of the masses. Trifling sums given to each every week or month – and the sums would be trifling indeed – would be frittered away, nine times out of ten, in things which pertain to the body and not to the spirit; upon richer food and drink, better clothing, more extravagant living, which are beneficial neither to rich nor poor.”

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Never trust a man who owns a castle 

Carnegie’s view of working class struggles… is as cruel as it is ignorant.  His description better fits what the upper class did with surplus wealth– there is nothing wrong with a family man wanting better clothes for his children, or a sturdier roof over his head.  Carnegie’s philanthropy must be observed with a critical eye.

Madison and Original Intent

Joe Ellis explained the absence of serious Madison biographies… by proclaiming “he’s boring as hell” and that “only lawyers like him.” As previously stated, Ellis’s recent comments on the Framers and Original Intent cast doubt on the rigor of his scholarship- and these nuggets of wisdom only enhance the evidence of his misguided revisionism.

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The revision Ellis is peddling holds that Madison and other Framers… rejected the doctrine of Original Intent on its face. The only empirical evidence supporting this notion is Madison’s oft quoted explanation for not publishing his notes on the Constitutional Convention.  Once established, the government continued to disappoint Madison, driving him closer to his friend Jefferson.  During his presidency, Madison undoubtedly supported Original Intent as he battled John Marshall and Congress for the soul of the Constitution. He feared the elasticity in the Constitution was being abused by ambitious demagogues- Madison wanted the power of government restrained- his original intent.

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