Facts in Five

Jefferson’s Presidency by the numbers

  • National debt in 1801- $112 million 
  • Percentage of budget Jefferson designated to pay the debt- 78%
  • The population of the US in 1801 was 5, 305, 982  – 893, 605 were slaves
  • The United States paid $15 million for the Louisiana territory in 1803-  Equivalent to $233 million today
  • The Federal budget in 1803 was $8.2 million before the Louisiana Purchase
  • Jefferson was prepared to pay $10 million for New Orleans alone, the extra 828,000 square miles were a bargain at just under 3 cents per acre

Facts in Five- Monticello

Jefferson edition #2-  Monticello

  • Hurry up and finish!  – Jefferson started construction in 1769 and never stopped building until 1809.  Jefferson was the primary architect and a majority of the labor was completed by slaves.
  • The tour seemed rather short-  There are 43 rooms in Monticello, many are on the upper floors which are closed to the public today. 
  • Domes are all the rage-  The dome at Monticello was installed in 1800 and was the first ever seen in America.  All of the glass within the dome was made in Austria. 
  • Privacy please! – The green lattice installed around his bed chamber and office was to keep visitors from peeking in his windows…sorry, conspiracy theorists, it had nothing to do with secret rendezvouses with Sally Hemings
  • Plenty of elbow room-  Monticello is over 11,000 sq. feet including basement space.  There are eight fireplaces and two staircases.  Rooms on the second and third floor only have 8′ ceilings.  The house is 110′ long, 87′ wide, and nearly 45′ high. 

Jefferson to Wasington- Free Press

Thomas Jefferson cautioned George Washington about the importance of a free press…. his words should serve as warning to citizens today…

“No government ought to be without censors, and where the press is free, no one ever will. If virtuous, it need not fear the fair operation of attack and defense. Nature has given to man no other means of sifting out the truth whether in religion, law or politics. I think it as honorable to the government neither to know nor notice its sycophants or censors, as it would be undignified and criminal to pamper the former and persecute the latter.”